CITY TIPS

Welcome to Perú.
Lima is a fascinating city, and its charm is discovered little by little. Its historic center is one of the best preserved in the Americas. There are also many archaeological sites that are both in the suburbs and in the city and they speak to all the different stages of the Inca empire.

The contrast with the more modern neighborhoods of Lima is a sight to see. Peruvian architecture and cuisine are recognized worldwide for its richness and diversity.

HOUSING
Housing is usually the largest expenditure for expats. Housing prices can vary considerably within the same district.

The most popular areas in Lima are: Miraflores, San Isidro, Camacho, La Planicie, La Molina, Chacarilla, Los Incas Golf Club, Monterrico and Surco.
Apartments for rent are available in most areas like San Isidro, Miraflores, Barranco and Surco while houses are mainly found in the area of La Molina.

If you want to be close to the “action”, you’ll probably prefer a coastal district like Miraflores or Barranco. If you prefer something quieter and more residential, San Borja and Santiago de Surco are good choices.


EDUCATION
If you have school-aged children, private school will most likely be the best option for you.  Schools can be found to fit every budget, from parochial schools to international schools in Lima and elsewhere in the country.

Expats looking for an international school in Peru for their children have 15 international schools to choose from in just Lima. Some of these international schools include Cambridge College, Peruvian North American Abraham Lincoln School, Hiram Bingham International School, International Christian School of Lima and Colegio Magister. Subjects are mostly taught in English and Spanish, while other schools also have German and French as electives.

Depending on the school, child´s age and the grade you are applying to, you can find yourself on a waiting list for admission.

Links of interest
www.expatperu.com/international-schools-lima.php


MIGRATION
The maximum stay in Peru on a tourist visa is 183 days (per year). You can't extent your tourist visa once you´ve entered Peru. Peruvian tourist visas are single entry visa only. Like in most countries around the world you are not allowed to work on a tourist visa!

Regardless of the nationality, anyone travelling to Peru for business purposes, especially when business contracts or agreements are signed or business related financial transaction are made, has to apply for a business visa at a Peruvian Consulate before entering the country. The Peruvian business visa is a multiple entry visa and entitles its holder to enter Peru within a time period of 12 months from the date of issue.

Links of interest
www.migraciones.gob.pe
www.expatperu.com/econsulates.php

ENTERTAINMENT
Lima is considered the culinary capital of the Americas. It also offers some of the best museums in Latin America, where you can recreate a complete history of Peruvian archeology, history and art.

You will find modern shopping malls to elegant casinos and craft markets. Also places for adventure and sports, protected parks and bird watching and archaeological sites.

Links of interest
www.miguiagourmet.com/MiGuiaGourmet/MiGuiaGourmet.html
www.expatperu.com/aclubs.php
www.tripadvisor.co/Attractions-g294316-Activities-Lima_Lima_Region.html
www.agendameperu.com/

 

TIPS
While in Peru keep the following information in mind.

Security:
As in all major cities of the world, there is a high rate of theft in the form of pickpockets. Therefore, we recommend you carry money and credit cards in security belts, and preferably not to carry a handbag unless it is indispensable. Major hotels provide a safe and we encourage you to save valuables, passports, airline tickets and jewelry. Hand bags, cameras and camcorders must be used cautiously, with great care in places with large concentrations of people such as markets, train stations, public squares.


Links of interest

www.expatperu.com/safety-in-peru.html

Emergency contacts:
Police: 105
Firefighers:116
Ambulance: 117
Operator: 108

Holidays:
The national holidays are:
1st of January, New Years Eve
Easter: Between March and April (varies each year)
1st of May, Labor Day
13th of June, Corpus Christi
29th of June, St. Peter and St. Paul Day
30th of August, St. Rose Lima
8th of October, Angamos Battle
1st of November, All saints Day
8th of December, Holly Trinity
25th of December, Christmas day

TRANSPORTATION
Public buses are the usual mode of transport over long distances. They are cheap, frequent and relatively comfortable, at least on major routes; when you want to get off just yell out to the driver.

As for taxis, it is advisable to use the services of taxi companies (to be ordered by phone) or those authorized by the municipalities. In Peru taxi meters are not used, so you should negotiate the fare before boarding the taxi and inquire about the average fare to your destination. It is not customary to tip taxi drivers. Remember to bring change to pay for this service.

Links of interest
theultimateperulist.blogspot.com/2008/09/4e-transport-getting-around.html

GENERAL INFORMATION


Capital: Lima
Major Cities: Lima, Arequipa, Trujillo, Chiclayo, Piura, Iquitos, Cusco, Puno, Machu Picchu
Population: 29,546,963
Weather: Peru has two seasons: the dry season and the rainy season. The coast and western Andean regions tend to be dry. In the Andes, the dry season lasts from May to September and the rest of the year is mostly wet.
Currency: Nuevo Sol
Official Religion: Catholic
Language: Spanish
Electricity: The electrical voltage is 220V. 60 Hz plugs of two types are used, flat blade plug and round pin.
Country Calling Code: +51
Economy: Peru's economy today is a reflection of its varied geography; the different climate zones facilitate widespread agriculture, the Andes rich in natural resources allow mining and the Pacific Ocean with its ample supply of fish makes commercial fishing possible. Economic growth continues to be driven mainly by exports of minerals (mainly gold, copper, zinc), textiles, chemicals, agricultural products (garden produce and fruits), fish-meal, services and by energy projects making the country's economy vulnerable to fluctuation in world market prices. But the liberalization of the goods and labor markets, the opening up of trade through multiple international trade agreements, increased direct foreign investment has led to increased government revenues and growth in both domestic consumption and the development of the country's financial sector.

Links of interest
www.enperu.org
www.expatperu.com
www.peruthisweek.com
elsol.idiomasperu.com/about-living-in-lima-to-study-spanish-language.htm